beware of the leopard


ensalada-de-lengua-de-pajaritos:

Monsieur Hulot


weekendplaylist:

michicant (itunes session) // bon iver

ancientpeoples:

Relief of Antelopes

Egyptian

ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E.

The scene to which this block once belonged probably showed a desert hunting party. The hunters, Akhenaten and his entourage, would have appeared in chariots bearing down on their helpless prey. Their approach has not gone unnoticed: the ears of the two bubalis antelopes perk up at the sound of danger. The back of a third antelope may be seen in the lower right corner. Such isolated blocks provide a hint of the complex decorative schemes that once existed in the palace at el Amarna.

Source: Brooklyn Museum

hippiepiegypsybird:

Magpies can look like boring black and white birds until they open their wings and reveal their beautiful blue and green feathers <3

Apr 18reblog
11664 via/©

onlyalittlelion:

Guys, this is Regular Ordinary Swedish Meal Time and it is one of my very favorite things on the internet.

Apr 18reblog
31991 via/©

visual-poetry:

"my name as though it were written on the surface of the moon” by bruce nauman (1968)

nadidodi:

Orion in December. Charles Burchfield. 1959.

daguerreotypeimages:

SO PRECIOUS! (via Dennis A. Waters Fine Daguerreotypes)

scanzen:

Particle Tracks On Film from the Fermilab Bubble Chamber.

Apr 17reblog
13066 via/©

oldrussia:

1946

dionyssos:

=”George Catlin, The White Cloud, Head Chief of the Iowas, 1844-45”>

odrazy:

Nocturne in Black and Gold, The Falling Rocket by James Abbott McNeil Whistler (probably 1875)

Oil on Canvas, 60 x 47 cm

Detroit Institute of Arts, USA

James Abbott McNeil Whistler rejected the conventions of his era and maintained that ideas for painting are here to cause a special mood or atmosphere inside a person, and that creating a compositional harmony comes only after that. He often compared his paintings to visual music and gave them names such as ”symphony” or ”nocturne”. 

benjamingrimes:

Blood Moon eclipse. Next time I’m going to rent a longer lens.

4/15/14

Apr 16reblog
16819 via/©

explore-blog:

The Wizard of Oz reimagined by Lisbeth Zwerger, one of the most imaginative illustrators of our time  rare, gasp-gorgeous illustrations.

tierradentro:

"Watson and the Shark" (detail), 1778, John Singleton Copley.